June 2008


Uraecha bimaculataUraecha bimaculataUraecha bimaculataUraecha bimaculata

Coleoptera: Cerambycidae
Uraecha bimaculata
Longhorn Beetle = yahazu-kamikiri

Location: Mikan orange grove under Kodaijiyama (Google map)

I photographed these Xenicotela pardalina, but didn’t notice the much smaller Exocentrus lineatus underneath the branch until I got home and looked at the photos! Luckily, I found another Exocentrus lineatus separately (see here).

Xenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalinaXenicotela pardalina

Coleoptera: Cerambycidae
Xenicotela pardalina
Longhorn Beetle = chabo-higenaga-kamikiri

Location: Mikan orange grove under Kodaijiyama (Google map)

Exocentrus lineatusExocentrus lineatusExocentrus lineatusExocentrus lineatus

Coleoptera: Cerambycidae
Exocentrus lineatus
Longhorn Beetle = atomon-marukeshi-kamikiri

Location: Mikan orange grove under Kodaijiyama (Google map)

Euhadra peliomphalaEuhadra peliomphala

Mollusca: Pulmonata: Bradybaenidae
Euhadra peliomphala
Land snail = mizuji-maimai

Location: Mikan orange grove under Kodaijiyama (Google map)

I saw quite a few of these 2mm-long orange springtails (tobimushi) on the bark of a tree. Cute little fellows!

collembolacollembolacollembolacollembola

Location: Mikan orange grove under Kodaijiyama (Google map)

Collembola = tobimushi (springtails)

Yes, this is a spider! It looks like an ant, but if you look closely you’ll see that it has eight legs and lots of eyes. The theory is that they use their disguise either to help them sneak up on ants to eat them, or to help them avoid being eaten by predators themselves.

While I was watching one male ant spider, another male dashed up and tried to take over his territory. They had a quick battle, just like a pair of stag beetles (or even stags!) and the original one managed to push the intruder down the tree. After a few centimeters of being pushed, the intruder gave up and ran away. A true miniature battle!

Web page showing the different species of ant spiders in Japan: here.

Myrmarachne elongataMyrmarachne elongataMyrmarachne elongataMyrmarachne elongataMyrmarachne elongata

Arachnida: Araneae
Myrmarachne elongata
= yagata-ari-gumo

Location: Near Genkai town office (Google map)

(Male)

Ceriagrion nipponicumCeriagrion nipponicum

Odonata: Coenagrionida
Ceriagrion nipponicum
Damselfly = beni-ito-tombo

Location: Near Genkai town office (Google map)

(Male)

Paracercion calamorum calamorumParacercion calamorum calamorum

Odonata: Coenagrionida
Paracercion calamorum calamorum
Damselfly = kuro-ito-tombo

Location: Near Genkai town office (Google map)

The ragweed beetle (butakusa-hamushi) is a kind of leaf beetle. It was accidentally introduced into Japan from North America and was first found in 1996, near Tokyo. Since then it has spread throughout the country. In fact, because this beetle eats ragweed (butakusa), it is considered beneficial, although there is some concern that it might also damage sunflowers. You can find out more about this species here: Asian-Pacific Alien Species Database.

Ophraella communaOphraella communa

Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae
Ophraella communa
Ragweed Beetle = butakusa-hamushi

Location: Near Genkai town office (Google map)

This species of ladybird is pretty small – about 4mm. It has been used in the biological control of scale insects in, for example, micronesia.

Rodolia limbataRodolia limbataRodolia limbata

Coleoptera: Coccinellidae
Rodolia limbata
= beni-heri-tentou

Location: Near Genkai town office (Google map)

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